Good Neighborhood Publicity Helps Keep Demand High

Make sure to generate maximum neighborhood publicity with every  festival or genuine accomplishment.  Trumpet your neighborhood revitalization on social media. Cultivate reporters and bloggers, offer them silly freebies (we're talking T-shirts or caps, nothing more), take them on tours, make their work easy for them in any way you can. Take the trouble to explain your strategy for creating and maintaining a vibrant neighborhood, and all the thought and energy behind it.

If you do not know much about social media and don't use sites such as Facebook and Twitter personally, you'll have to learn.  For a good start, we like the Kivi Leroux Miller site on nonprofit marketing.

If you can write a great press release, do it.  Call us old-fashioned, but we find multiple internal and external uses for the press release, even if it never goes out to a long list of media as did 20 years ago.  Snippets can be adapted to social media and also to answering e-mail questions and sending reminders.   The press release now belongs on the Internet on your own website and any others relevant to your geography.  It becomes a master document that you can borrow from for many purposes.



If nobody in your group can write a press release, do not worry.  Many other techniques are available, as you will see.

Why You Need Positive P.R.

Some of you might resist the notion that you need publicity, or you might have been burned by negative neighborhood publicity.  The first thing to say is that you need the positive public relations just to build up a good impression of your area so that when bad things happen—and they can happen anywhere—you have a little backlog of favorable information with the public.

Wouldn’t you rather have people say, “Oh that’s unusual,” if something bad happens, as compared to having them hear of your neighborhood for the first time when there is a particularly dramatic crime, corruption, or dilapidation story?

How to Generate Free Publicity

If you don't have anyone in your community organization with a marketing background, turn to a local university for an intern for a semester. Better yet, manage an intern every semester for the university's benefit and yours.  Marketing people will generate plenty of ideas to help attract positive neighborhood publicity.

Enlist your young people, beginning with middle school, to help you. They have the patience to hang out on the Internet for hours on end to blog and tweet about your neighborhood, where it is, what's happening right this minute, why it's important, how cool it is, who they saw there, and all that stuff.

That's really the way to stir up talk in your town, for free.  You need buzz, and young people will create it for you in a way that paid advertising rarely does.

Keep in mind that often today, photos and video trump written storylines.   If you can stage an interesting photo and write a short paragraph as a caption for it, you often will attract more attention than if you spent hours wordsmithing just the perfect story.    Start a youtube channel if you have just one or two decent videographers in your orbit.  Youtube has a special program for nonprofits.

Learn to be effective in the use of hashtags on Twitter (or some other local discussions that have adapted this convention also) to get people talking about either your neighborhood overall or to specific projects, events, and programs.  Twitter is easy to learn (although hard for us to stay under 140 characters!).  A hashtag is a short word or phrase that starts with the pound key and allows people to continue discussing and referring to that word or phrase.

The other folks who will draw attention to your neighborhood are the artists. Yes, we know, they bring some out-of-the-mainstream behaviors, clothes, ideas, and just plain weirdness. But just think of this as self-expression and move on.

Arts-based community development is growing rapidly in the U.S. We've provide you with a page on community cultural development to explore this trend.

Of course neither arts nor any other single silver bullet will apply to all neighborhood revitalization situations. But we think you improve your chances if you pick a communications strategy, periodically re-evaluate it, and systematically work on getting specific message points across rather than simply trying to do everything everywhere.

Now we just used some fancy terms, so let’s be clear that you don’t have to have a lot of training to generate a "communications strategy."    But you should be able to make a list of the five to ten most important points you want people to remember about your neighborhood.  

Spend half an hour at a neighborhood association meeting brainstorming what those points should be, and then assign a committee to argue about the merits of each one.  Or use your executive committee for a change.

After you have the most important points safely on one or two computers, then think about the most advantageous words and phrases to use to convey each point.   Re-write your important points until you have your key messages down pat.



If you know what points you're trying to communicate through traditional or social media, it will be easier to evaluate whether the effort is worthwhile for time-honored neighborhood favorites, including:

  • Contests
  • Holiday celebrations
  • Parades
  • Tours
  • Carnivals and festivals
  • Clean-ups
  • Unusual or trendy fund-raising events

Granted, all these things will bring you free publicity if you do them right, but they all take volunteer-exhausting work too.


Advantages of Being Deliberate About Publicity

The advantages of a good neighborhood publicity program include:

  • An upbeat reputation results in higher property values for homeowners and higher rents (attracting a higher caliber of tenant) for rental property.
  • Success often leads to further success, so individual contributors, grantmakers, and foundations prefer to give money to those who already are known for good things.
  • It is easier to attract businesses, investors, and developers to meet your desired goals when there is already positive neighborhood publicity that people will remember.
  • Paradoxically, you will receive better quality city services from police, fire, garbage collectors, and more.  These municipal departments will assume that your residents are more vocal, more active, and more competent at complaining if service quality is poor.  As a sweeping generalization, they would be right too.

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